Classic Video Games Colecovision

Colecovision Images

The images of the Colecovision are categorized and show the console, joystick controllers and accessories. You will also find detailed close-ups of the ports and connections available on the Colecovision.

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Colecovision Console Box

ColecoVision console ColecoVision console box. Released in August 1982, the ColecoVision offered arcade-quality graphics and gaming with the ability to expand the system's basic hardware. Twelve titles were available at launch. Approximately 125 titles in total were published as ROM cartridges between 1982 and 1984. River West Brands currently owns the Coleco and ColecoVision brand name.

Colecovision Console Images

ColecoVision console ColecoVision console showing the controllers stored in their internal compartment. The door to the Expansion Module #1 is open showing the connector. Coleco licensed Nintendo's Donkey Kong as the official pack-in cartridge for ColecoVision consoles. This version of the game was beloved and declared a near-perfect arcade port by many gamers. By Christmas of 1982, Coleco had sold more than 500,000 consoles partly due to the awesomeness of Donkey Kong as the pack-in game.
ColecoVision console
ColecoVision console ColecoVision console - left side. Coleco reduced its video game division, finally leaving the video game market at the end of the summer in 1985. The ColecoVision was officially discontinued by October 1985 with estimated total console sales over over 2 million units.
ColecoVision console
ColecoVision console ColecoVision console - right side. The design of the controllers is similar to that of Mattel's Intellivision - rectangular with a numeric keypad and side buttons. In place of Mattel's circular control disc the ColecoVision controller has a short, 1.5-inch joystick. The keypad is designed to accept a thin plastic overlay that maps the keys for a particular game much like the Intellivision or Atari 5200.
ColecoVision console
ColecoVision console ColecoVision console - top view.
ColecoVision console ColecoVision console - rear view.
ColecoVision console Bottom of the ColecoVision console.
ColecoVision console Close-up on the manufacturer's sticker on the bottom of the ColecoVision console.
ColecoVision console The controllers connected to the ColecoVision console from inside their storage area. The ColecoVision's main competitor was the Atari 5200 which was more advanced but less commercially successful.
ColecoVision console ColecoVision console 3/4 view.
ColecoVision console ColecoVision console with Gorf cartridge inserted.

Colecovision Joystick Controllers

Colecovision Joystick Controllers Colecovision controllers had 2 side-mounted fire buttons. Similar to the Atari 5200 orientation, I never liked side-mounted fire buttons.
Colecovision Joystick Controllers Colecovision controllers connected via curly-cords (like the Intellivision) which tended to "pull against" the controller when extended too far. I much preferred straight cables.
Colecovision Joystick Controllers Front view of the Colecovision controller showing the height of the hybrid joystick / disc mechanism. It was similar to the disc control of the Intellivision controllers and was raised up about an 1½ inches.
Colecovision Joystick Controllers Bottom of the Colecovision controller.
Colecovision Joystick Controllers Colecovision controllers had a 12-key keypad and were detachable from the built-in cradles that stored them when not in use. The connection is the same form-factor as the Atari 2600 joysticks.
Colecovision Joystick Controllers View inside the controller cradle where the controller connects to the console. Player 1 & 2 are also identified inside this storage area. The connection on the Colecovision's detachable controllers is identical to the one found on the Atari 2600. As long as your game doesn't require the second fire button, the 2600 stick can be used.
Colecovision Joystick Controllers Wico joystick for Colecovision. Interestingly, this controller has the 12-button keypad built into the unit. I own a Wico stick for the Atari 5200 (another stick with a keypad) and they supply a Y-cable so you can use the 5200 keypad and the Wico stick.

Colecovision Ports & Connections

ColecoVision Expansion Module Interface ColecoVision Expansion Module Interface located on the front of the console.
ColecoVision Expansion Module Interface
ColecoVision Expansion Module Interface ColecoVision cartridge slot located on the top/front of the console. Also shown are the power and reset switches.
ColecoVision Expansion Module Interface ColecoVision channel selector switch and A/V output on the rear of the console.
ColecoVision Expansion Module Interface ColecoVision power port on the rear of the console.
ColecoVision internal PCB The top side of the ColecoVision's internal PCB - motherboard.
ColecoVision internal PCB The underside of the ColecoVision's internal PCB - motherboard.

Colecovision Accessories

Super Game Module for the ColecoVision Super Game Module, by Opcode Games, for the ColecoVision console was to begin shipping in late 2012. It's a piece of home-brew hardware, licensed by Coleco. The Super Game Module plugs into the Expansion Port on the ColecoVision providing better graphics and sound when playing SGM cartridges that are specifically designed to take advantage of it's capabilities. Super Game cartridges feature much better detail of your arcade games, adding things like "intermissions" and special extras.

You can also enter the initials of the high scorers on the screen much like you would when playing an arcade game. The SGM can be left in the expansion port and your regular Colecovision games will play properly - no enhancements, though. When you insert a Super Game cart, it will offer all the enhancements.

This product from Opcode Games is not to be confused with the Module #3 originally proposed to be the ColecoVision Super Game Module using game wafers as the storage medium. Coleco showed a mock-up of the SGM at the 1983 New York Toy Show, but it was never manufactured.

Atarimax Colecovision Ultimate SD Multi-Cart Atarimax Colecovision Ultimate SD Multi-Cart showing the LED illuminated as it properly reads the boot info. The Colecovision Ultimate SD Cartridge is a high quality, professionally produced multi-cart for the Colecovision game system. It's capable of playing all standard 32K or less ROM images and MEGA-CART Bank-switched ROM images up to 512KB.
Atarimax Colecovision Ultimate SD Multi-Cart The Ultimate SD is the most advanced cartridge ever produced for the Colecovision and includes a 50 MIPS onboard CPU, advanced upgradable hardware logic, 512KB of SRAM and 128KB of block flash.
Atarimax Colecovision Ultimate SD Multi-Cart The bank switching logic, CPU firmware, boot flash and menu software are all 100% field upgradable by just placing new files on the SD card and turning on the system.
ColecoVision console cover ColecoVision console cover. in 1983, it seemed clear that video game consoles were being supplanted by home computers. Coleco introduced the Adam home computer, both as a stand-alone system and as an expansion module to the ColecoVision. This effort failed and Coleco withdrew from electronics early in 1985.
ColecoVision power adapter ColecoVision power adapter. In 1983, Coleco released the Cabbage Patch Kids series of dolls which were insanely successful.

Colecovision's Expansion Module 1 - Atari 2600 VCS Adapter

ColecoVision with 2600 adapter in the expansion slot ColecoVision with 2600 adapter in the expansion slot. This hardware add-on called the Expansion Module #1 (1982) made the ColecoVision compatible with Atari 2600 games. This gave ColecoVision the largest software library of any console of its time.
ColecoVision 2600 adapter Top view of the ColecoVision 2600 adapter.
ColecoVision 2600 adapter
ColecoVision 2600 adapter ColecoVision 2600 adapter. The expansion module brought legal action from Atari, but they couldn't halt sales of the module because the 2600 could be reproduced with standard parts. Coleco was also able to design and market the Gemini game system which was an exact clone of the 2600, but with combined joystick/paddle controllers.
ColecoVision 2600 adapter ColecoVision 2600 adapter - top view.
ColecoVision 2600 adapter ColecoVision 2600 adapter. When Coleco made the Expansion module #1 Atari 2600 adapter they never considered a cartridge that was a different size case from the standard 2600 norm. TigerVision carts would not make electrical contact since the plastic cartridge housing was not deep enough.
ColecoVision 2600 adapter ColecoVision 2600 adapter - left side view.
ColecoVision 2600 adapter ColecoVision 2600 adapter. Right side view.
ColecoVision 2600 adapter ColecoVision 2600 adapter. rear view showing the connection to the Coleco console.
ColecoVision 2600 adapter Overhead, rear view showing the depth of the connection into the Coleco console.
ColecoVision 2600 adapter buttons Connection port on the ColecoVision 2600 adapter.
ColecoVision 2600 adapter buttons ColecoVision 2600 adapter buttons
ColecoVision 2600 adapter ColecoVision 2600 adapter joystick ports. In 2005, River West Brands, a Chicago-based brand revitalization company, re-introduced Coleco to the world. In 2006, they introduced the Coleco Sonic, a handheld system containing twenty Sega Master System and Sega Game Gear games.
ColecoVision 2600 adapter buttons The Atari 2600 cartridge slot on the ColecoVision 2600 adapter.
ColecoVision 2600 adapter buttons The Atari 2600 cartridge slot on the ColecoVision 2600 adapter with a Ms. Pac-Man Atari cart inserted.

Coleco Console Clone Images

Coleco Gemini was an Atari 2600 clone The Coleco Gemini was an Atari 2600 clone manufactured by Coleco. When Atari's lawsuit against the expansion port 2600 adapter failed due to the parts not being unique, Coleco decided go the distance and make a stand-alone Atari 2600 clone named the Gemini. Coleco struck a deal with Columbia House to start a video game club similar to its record club. Columbia sold the Coleco Gemini as the Columbia Home Arcade through the Columbia House Video Game Club.
Dina ColecoVision console clone Dina is a ColecoVision console clone. In 1986, Bit Corporation produced this ColecoVision clone called the Dina, which was sold in the United States by Telegames as the Telegames Personal Arcade.

Colecovision Promotional Items

ColecoVision in-store display cabinet ColecoVision retail store display used to allow customers to play various Coleco games as well as display available games.
ColecoVision in-store display cabinet ColecoVision retail store display.
ColecoVision magazine advertisement 1982 ColecoVision magazine ad.
ColecoVision magazine advertisement 1983 ColecoVision magazine ad for the Super Action Controller.
ColecoVision magazine advertisement 1983 ad for Power Lords: Quest For Volcan - a ColecoVision game that never made it past the prototype stage. It was to also be released on Odyssey and Atari 2600.
ColecoVision magazine advertisement March 11, 1983 ad for the Colecovision game console, accessories and games. There is even mention of some Atari 2600 games that are coleco-compatible via the expansion module. This ad was for products available at Caldor, a discount box-store retailer similar to Walmart or Target. Caldor went out of business in 1999.
ColecoVision magazine advertisement European ColecoVision ad for the console and a variety of game titles.
ColecoVision magazine advertisement "If you can find a more advanced video game system, it won't be on this planet."

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