Classic Video Games NEC TurboGrafX-16

NEC TurboGrafX-16 Images

The images of the TurboGrafX-16 are categorized and show the console, joystick controllers and accessories. You will also find detailed close-ups of the ports and connections available on the TurboGrafX-16.

TurboGrafX-16 Image Navigation:


NEC TurboGrafX-16 Box & Packaging Images

NEC TurboGrafX-16 box The front of NEC TurboGrafX-16 box. Officially called the TurboGrafX-16 Entertainment SuperSystem, the TurboGrafX-16 was released in North America on August 29, 1989. It was developed by Hudson Soft and NEC in a joint venture.

NEC TurboGrafX-16 Console

NEC TurboGrafX-16 console The top of NEC TurboGrafX-16 console showing the game slot. TIt has an 8-bit CPU and a dual 16-bit GPU. It's capable of displaying 482 colors simultaneously, out of 512. With dimensions of 5.5in 5.5in 1.5in, the NEC PC Engine (Japanese version) holds the record for the world's smallest game console ever made.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 console The front of NEC TurboGrafX-16 console showing the power switch and controller port. Oddly, it only had one controller port. Known for its shooters, the console did quite well considering it's single controller port.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 console The left side of NEC TurboGrafX-16 console. In 1994, NEC released the Japan-only PC-FX console, a 32-bit system with a tower-design. In 1998, NEC finally abandoned the video games industry partnered with former rival Sega, providing a version of its PowerVR 2 Chipset for the Dreamcast.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 console The left side of NEC TurboGrafX-16 console. The TurboGrafX-16 was the first console to have an optional CD module, allowing the standard benefits of CD media such as more storage, cheaper media costs, and redbook audio.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 console The right side of NEC TurboGrafX-16 console. HuCards offered a limited form of region protection that was nothing more than running the HuCard's pinout connections in a different arrangement. There were 2 major 3rd party converters sold to remove the protection. Both were sold to convert Japanese titles for play on a TurboGrafX-16. There was no region-protection on CD games.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 console The right side of NEC TurboGrafX-16 console. The TurboGrafX-16 was marketed as a direct competitor to the NES. Early TV ads touted the console's superior graphics and sound. The TurboGrafX-16 was also a competitor to the Sega Genesis, but Sega quickly won that battle.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 console The rear of NEC TurboGrafX-16 console - which looks more like the front. It was billed as a next generation 16-bit console, but it was built around an 8-bit microprocessor as its CPU. It maintained a competition with other consoled due to it's overall hardware speed that was comparable to contemporary 16-bit machines.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 console The rear of NEC TurboGrafX-16 console. Initially, the TurboGrafX-16 sold well in North America, but it suffered a lack of 3rd party software developers and publishers. The larger software devs like Konami supported the PC Engine in Japan, but also produced games for Nintendo. Due to Nintendo's exclusivity contracts, many developers were compelled to pick the popular NES as their platform of choice.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 console The bottom of NEC TurboGrafX-16 console. The TurboGrafX-16 was originally marketed in North America by NEC Home Electronics. As the system's popularity fell, the platform was handed over to a new company, Turbo Technologies Incorporated (TTI). TTTI was composed of former NEC Home Electronics & Hudson Soft employees and took over marketing and primary software development for the TurboGrafX-16.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 console Detail shot of the specs on the bottom of NEC TurboGrafX-16 console.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 console The NEC TurboGrafX-16 console with Turbo Pad controller. At launch, TV ads appeared in North America and become more extensive in 1990, when NEC began promoting Bonk as the next big thing in gaming.

NEC TurboGrafX-16 Controller - Turbo Pad

NEC TurboGrafX-16 controller The NEC TurboGrafX-16's Turbo Pad controller. The SuperGrafx is a variation of the hardware and is similar to the original, except it has a duplicate set of video chips - plus an extra chip to coordinate the two - 4-times as much RAM, twice as much video RAM. The CPU, sound, and color palette were not upgraded, making the high cost disadvantageous for the console.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 controller The NEC TurboGrafX-16's Turbo Pad controller. All PC Engine systems support the same controller peripherals, including pads, joysticks and multi-taps.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 controller The NEC TurboGrafX-16's Turbo Pad controller. All PC Engine hardware is NTSC - even the European version which creates PAL-compatible video by using of a chroma encoder chip not found in any other system in the series.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 controller Bottom of the NEC TurboGrafX-16's Turbo Pad controller. The largest Japanese HuCard games were ~20 Mbit. The name, Hu Card, came from "Hudson Soft", the company who developed this game card technology.

NEC TurboGrafX-16 Ports & Connections

NEC TurboGrafX-16 console The NEC TurboGrafX-16's game card slot. HuCards aka: Hudson Cards were called "TurboChip" in North America and based on the BeeCard technology Hudson piloted on the MSX. The cards were about the size of a credit card (slightly thicker) and were similar to the card format used by the Sega Master System for budget games. Unlike the Sega Master System, which also supported cartridges, the TurboGrafX-16 used HuCards exclusively.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 console The NEC TurboGrafX-16's single (and only) controller port located on the front of the console. Players who wanted to take advantage of the simultaneous multiplayer game modes had to buy the Turbo Tap - a multitap accessory which permitted five controllers to be plugged into the system.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 console The Channel select switch and A/V Out port on the left side of the NEC TurboGrafX-16 console. The TurboExpress was a portable version of the TurboGrafX, released in 1990 and was the most advanced handheld of its time. It was able to play all the TG-16's HuCard games 5 years before the Sega Nomad could do the same for Genesis games.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 console
NEC TurboGrafX-16 console The NEC TurboGrafX-16's Power switch and game slot. The TurboDuo combined the TurboGrafX-16 & a new version of the CD-ROM drive into one unit. It could play audio CDs, CD+Gs, CD-ROM2 and Super CD games as well as HuCards.

NEC TurboGrafX-16 Accessories

NEC TurboGrafX-16 power brick Details on the NEC TurboGrafX-16's external power supply (brick). Several TurboGrafX-16 games have been release on Nintendo's Virtual Console download area giving new life to a number of classic games.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 power brick The NEC TurboGrafX-16's RF box. The longest running NEC publication was available in Japan called the PC-Engine Fan Magazine which was dedicated to NEC game consoles.
NEC TurboGrafX-16 power brick

NEC SuperGrafx Console

NEC Super GrafX Console Originally announced as the PC Engine 2, it was alleged to be a true 16-bit system with improved graphics and sound over the original PC Engine. The SuperGrafx was to be released in 1990, but was released several months earlier in late 1989 with few improvements over the original PC Engine. Only 7 games were made that could take advantage of the improved SuperGrafx hardware. However the SuperGrafx is backwards compatible with all PC Engine games.

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